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Author Topic: Quiet to loud helmet.  (Read 1075 times)

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TinSpinner

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Re: Quiet to loud helmet.
« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2017, 09:10:15 AM »

I have the Schuberth C3 Pro and use the Bose QuietComfort 20 Acoustic Noise Cancelling Headphones.  It is amazingly quite.  I have always rode with ear plugs before this and with the Bose it is night and day.

 :oops: :nixweiss:

I'm sure that is a great set up, I love my Bose QC 35's. I just wonder how comfortable that is with a helmet on. I've tried ear buds with a helmet before and couldn't stand it for long, not enough room in my helmet I guess.
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charles05663

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Re: Quiet to loud helmet.
« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2017, 03:29:59 PM »

I'm sure that is a great set up, I love my Bose QC 35's. I just wonder how comfortable that is with a helmet on. I've tried ear buds with a helmet before and couldn't stand it for long, not enough room in my helmet I guess.

They are a pain putting your helmet on and if you pull one out, like catching the little bud wires, you have stop to readjust.  I will say when done properly it is quieter then my car without ear buds.

 :oops: :nixweiss:
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CVODON

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Re: Quiet to loud helmet.
« Reply #17 on: June 17, 2017, 05:31:31 PM »

If you are only interested in comfort and quite, try a set of the moulded earplugs. I have them for trap and they are great. Mine don't have speakers but they are readily available with sound if that is something you are interested in
Have a Honda friend who rides with the ones that have speakers, he has a hearing problem and is very concerned about sound and they work well for him.
You can even buy the kit and make them at home if interested. Bought mine at a big shoot in Ohio and sometimes if shooting over 200 a day wear muffs over them. They fit so well I have forgot and started home with them still on in the car.
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guppytrash

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Re: Quiet to loud helmet.
« Reply #18 on: June 17, 2017, 07:21:09 PM »

Schuberth C3 pro with a Sena 10u.  Best helmet I have ever owned.
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Fireguy

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Re: Quiet to loud helmet.
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2017, 03:36:23 PM »

I have the Schuberth C3 Pro and use the Bose QuietComfort 20 Acoustic Noise Cancelling Headphones.  It is amazingly quite.  I have always rode with ear plugs before this and with the Bose it is night and day.

 :oops: :nixweiss:
I've been reading on some of the other forums in regards to the Bose noise canceling earbuds that you can occasionally get a popping sound. Have you experienced this at all?
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charles05663

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Re: Quiet to loud helmet.
« Reply #20 on: June 20, 2017, 12:49:35 AM »

I've been reading on some of the other forums in regards to the Bose noise canceling earbuds that you can occasionally get a popping sound. Have you experienced this at all?

I can't say that I have.  I really don't recall so if I have it has not been a big issue for me.

 :oops: :nixweiss:
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bad00serg

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Re: Quiet to loud helmet.
« Reply #21 on: June 20, 2017, 08:17:47 AM »

I'll go against the trend and say that I don't think there is anything wrong with a five year old helmet.  How often are you guys buying new helmets??

The industry wants you to think they need changed every x years, but I don't buy it.  What is a helmet made from that degrades so quickly?  Do you replace the armor in your jacket, the various foams and paddings throughout your bike or car, or your car's seatbelt or airbag every x years?  I don't think a helmet lasts 20 years, but I think they do last beyond 5.  Just my two cents on my 35 years of riding on and off road...
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CVODON

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Re: Quiet to loud helmet.
« Reply #22 on: June 20, 2017, 05:56:27 PM »

I agree with the 5 year suggestion, Fiberglass will degrade in the sun and become brittle, only way you will know is when it breaks. I do replace my coats more often than 5years, which also replaces the armor. Hardly, if ever, own a car over 5 years, my current gloves are high end (to me) HELD and now @ almost 5 years are worn out so I will be replacing soon. I am big on safety and they also get safer every year.
So yep I totally disagree with your ideas, sorry.
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CHH_Badkarma

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Re: Quiet to loud helmet.
« Reply #23 on: June 20, 2017, 07:27:46 PM »

Five years in a sunny state like CA, getting lots of use would take more of a toll than say, five years in a state with more "seasonal" riding. Something to ponder there I suppose.
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bad00serg

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Re: Quiet to loud helmet.
« Reply #24 on: June 21, 2017, 08:34:23 AM »

Here is some info from the website helmets.org that makes sense to me.  I just don't believe that helmet materials in particular degrade significantly enough to effect safety in 3-5 years.  The helmet manufacturers push the short life span as it mitigates their liability on any helmets greater than their said life span:

Occasionally somebody spreads rumors that sweat and ultraviolet (UV) exposure will cause your helmet to degrade. Sweat will not do that. The standards do not permit manufacturers to make a helmet that degrades from sweat, and the EPS, EPP or EPU foam is remarkably unaffected by salt water. Your helmet will get a terminal case of grunge before it dies of sweat. Sunlight can affect the strength of the shell material, though. Since helmets spend a lot of time in the sun, manufacturers usually put UV inhibitors in the plastic for their shells that control UV degradation. If your helmet is fading or showing small cracks around the vents, the UV inhibitors may be failing, so you probably should replace it. Chances are it has seen an awful lot of sun to have that happen. Otherwise, try another brand next time and let us know what brand faded on you.

At least one shop told a customer that the EPS in his three year old helmet was now "dried out." Other sales people refer to "outgassing" and say that the foam loses gas and impact performance is affected. Still others claim that helmets lose a percentage of their effectiveness each year, with the percentage growing with age. All of that is nothing but marketing hype to sell a replacement helmet before you need it. There is some loss of aromatics in the first hours and days after molding, and helmet designers take account of that for standards testing. But after that the foam stabilizes and does not change for many years, unless the EPS is placed in an oven for some period of time and baked. The interior of your car, for example, will not do that, based on helmets we have seen and at least one lab crash test of a helmet always kept in a car in Virginia over many summers. Helmet shells can be affected by car heat, but not the foam. The Snell Memorial Foundation has tested motorcycle helmets held in storage for more than 20 years and found that they still meet the original standard.

In 2015 MEA Forensic reported on their extensive testing of used (but not crashed) bicycle helmets shows that the foam liners retain their performance over many years. Some of the helmets were as old as 26 years. They crash tested 675 helmets in their lab. Their analysis showed that there was no significant impact performance change with age. Their data including all 675 helmets tested produced only a 0.7g per year increase in impact readings at the higher drop height. After crash testing the helmets on a standard test rig, MEA took core samples from an uncrashed area of 63 helmets and tested them. This generated data based solely on the foam performance. Again, the findings indicate that helmet liner foam does not deteriorate with age. We have more on this landmark study in this Update newsletter.


I think if you have the means to replace your expensive helmet often, that's great but unnecessary.  Kinda like oil changes, do it more frequently if it makes you feel better but in reality it is likely unnecessary.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2017, 08:45:43 AM by bad00serg »
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Indenial

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Re: Quiet to loud helmet.
« Reply #25 on: July 03, 2017, 08:02:59 AM »

I too have the Schuberth C3 and use the Bose noise canceling ear buds.  I have to say, after two years, I haven't used my expensive audio system. The Bose are so quiet and the music so clear, that I just don't want to go back. Love them. And I have never had the "popping sound" that somebody mentioned. 
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Road Dad

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Re: Quiet to loud helmet.
« Reply #26 on: July 03, 2017, 08:18:14 AM »

The primary concern is the interior, not the exterior. And the life span is max 5 years for a motorcycle helmet.

Helmets.org covers bicycle helmets. Completely diffferent design and material.




Here is some info from the website helmets.org that makes sense to me.  I just don't believe that helmet materials in particular degrade significantly enough to effect safety in 3-5 years.  The helmet manufacturers push the short life span as it mitigates their liability on any helmets greater than their said life span:

Occasionally somebody spreads rumors that sweat and ultraviolet (UV) exposure will cause your helmet to degrade. Sweat will not do that. The standards do not permit manufacturers to make a helmet that degrades from sweat, and the EPS, EPP or EPU foam is remarkably unaffected by salt water. Your helmet will get a terminal case of grunge before it dies of sweat. Sunlight can affect the strength of the shell material, though. Since helmets spend a lot of time in the sun, manufacturers usually put UV inhibitors in the plastic for their shells that control UV degradation. If your helmet is fading or showing small cracks around the vents, the UV inhibitors may be failing, so you probably should replace it. Chances are it has seen an awful lot of sun to have that happen. Otherwise, try another brand next time and let us know what brand faded on you.

At least one shop told a customer that the EPS in his three year old helmet was now "dried out." Other sales people refer to "outgassing" and say that the foam loses gas and impact performance is affected. Still others claim that helmets lose a percentage of their effectiveness each year, with the percentage growing with age. All of that is nothing but marketing hype to sell a replacement helmet before you need it. There is some loss of aromatics in the first hours and days after molding, and helmet designers take account of that for standards testing. But after that the foam stabilizes and does not change for many years, unless the EPS is placed in an oven for some period of time and baked. The interior of your car, for example, will not do that, based on helmets we have seen and at least one lab crash test of a helmet always kept in a car in Virginia over many summers. Helmet shells can be affected by car heat, but not the foam. The Snell Memorial Foundation has tested motorcycle helmets held in storage for more than 20 years and found that they still meet the original standard.

In 2015 MEA Forensic reported on their extensive testing of used (but not crashed) bicycle helmets shows that the foam liners retain their performance over many years. Some of the helmets were as old as 26 years. They crash tested 675 helmets in their lab. Their analysis showed that there was no significant impact performance change with age. Their data including all 675 helmets tested produced only a 0.7g per year increase in impact readings at the higher drop height. After crash testing the helmets on a standard test rig, MEA took core samples from an uncrashed area of 63 helmets and tested them. This generated data based solely on the foam performance. Again, the findings indicate that helmet liner foam does not deteriorate with age. We have more on this landmark study in this Update newsletter.


I think if you have the means to replace your expensive helmet often, that's great but unnecessary.  Kinda like oil changes, do it more frequently if it makes you feel better but in reality it is likely unnecessary.
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