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Author Topic: Heat Dissipating Coating  (Read 549 times)

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lowflight

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Heat Dissipating Coating
« on: April 17, 2018, 11:54:26 PM »

Anyone with any experience using Heat Dissipating Coatings on the heads and cylinders?
 
I am considering using it on a 110 air cooled, but currently sitting firmly on the fence. Manufacturer states it is good up to 500F and I have seen some documentation stating 10-15% increase in heat transfer over non coated materials. It also states that the coating stands up well for durability and chemical exposure. I think it might be an improvement over powder coating in the F'n hot arena, might not be much but improvement is improvement. You can see where I live and we get few warm days here.

If anyone has looked into this or is using it, your comments would be helpful. 
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Re: Heat Dissipating Coating
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2018, 12:20:54 AM »

I would be hesitant to recommend any extra coatings on the heads and cylinders.  Applying another layer of coating runs the risk of converting the inner layer into an insulator, reducing the amount of passive heat transfer.

The theory behind ceramic coating of exhaust headers, piston crowns, and combustion chambers is to prevent heat absorption by those components, thus forcing the heat to exit the engine and be exhausted out the back...which is also a benefit of deleting the catalytic converter.

It would be much easier and cheaper on your air-cooled engine to add fans to the oil cooler and to blow on the heads.  These will maximize heat transfer away from the engine when stopped at traffic lights, etc.  The Big Sky oil cooler fans http://bigskyfan.tripod.com/ are very effective, inexpensive, and easy to install.  The same company also makes a Parade Fan system that has 3 fans blowing on the engine's top end.  These are much less $$ than the Love Jugs.
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lowflight

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Re: Heat Dissipating Coating
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2018, 12:47:17 AM »

Thanks! I agree with not adding over the powder coating and share that same thought. If I go forward with the coating I will have the parts chemically stripped and then they need to be blasted with Aluminum Oxide to provide the chemical bond needed for the coating to correctly adhere. 

In what I have been able to find is that powder coat doesn't do a great job of shedding the heat. But clearly the alloy's used in today's engines can deal with that coating. I read one study that stated painted cylinders and heads stay cooler than either powder coated or even bare.

I talked with Tech Support today at the coating manufacture and asked them about what I was considering, of course they are for it and said their product should do a great job -no surprise there. They recommend using a different coating then what I was considering and this is suppose to withstand up to 2,000F.

I have a set of Wards Fans on the bike and of course those help.


 
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Re: Heat Dissipating Coating
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2018, 01:40:30 AM »

Not to rain on the parade, but...is it really worth the money required to disassemble, strip, blast, coat, and reassemble the engine for the relatively small increase in heat transfer?  The Ward's fans already push a lot of heat away, and for under $100 for Big Sky fans you can really improve cooling and comfort in stop-n-go, where it counts.  Just sayin'...
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lowflight

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Re: Heat Dissipating Coating
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2018, 10:48:45 AM »

I am going to replace the lifters for some reason?? Then you know while I am in there....113 and so on. I have a set of extra heads but they are granite and my motor is black and that is what started me down this road. Not sure if any real change would be realized with using a heat dissipating coating or not, but it is used on other applications that it seems to perform pretty good.

I wonder what type of powder Harley uses as it some rather stout stuff, "normal" powders are good for 250-300F. That powder Harley uses withstands the temps in the combustion chamber. I think they end up coating the inside of the head as a matter of production run and not for any form of enhancement. There are lots of theories about having it in the combustion chamber, aiding in atomization and so on but I haven't found anything that really supports it being in there.

I still have not made up my mind, but I certainly am leaning on giving it a try. There are some coatings out there that perform better in shedding heat than what I am considering but currently they are only available in colors that I have no interest in.       

I certainly can be over thinking this? 
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Re: Heat Dissipating Coating
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2018, 03:56:38 AM »

Ah yes, the dreaded lifters...good idea to replace those before you have to replace the whole engine.
 :o     Now I see how you started down this road.

As far as powder coating, there are two major types: thermo-setting, and thermo-plastic.  Thermoplastic powdercoat will soften and even melt/burn at exhaust heat shield temperatures, while thermosetting stands up to much higher temps.

Good luck, and let us know what you decide to do.
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